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Below are 17 journal entries, after skipping by the 20 most recent ones recorded in speceditor666's LiveJournal:

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Friday, May 4th, 2007
9:26 am
Rhysling Anthology 2007
List of the nominees to be included in this edition: http://www.sfpoetry.com/archive/rhysling07.htm





Monday, April 9th, 2007
11:19 am
Rhysling Awards and Doorways update

Just a quick post.

I have three poems from '06 nominated for the current Rhysling Award from the Science Fiction Poetry Association.

"Phantasia!" from Bondage Tales of Obsession (long)
"Frost Bitten" from Dark Wisdom #10 (short)
"Atom's Apple" written with Roger E. Naylor from Scifaikuest 4th Anniversary Issue (short)

***

The second Doorways Poetry Contest is over. The winning poem "Dali's Nightmare" was submitted by Terrie Leigh Relf. There were four honorable mentions submitted by Marge Simon, M. Frost, Duane Ackerson, and Christopher Danaher. The five poems will appear in Doorways Magazine #2 due out in May. The featured poet for this issue is SFPA President Deborah P Kolodji.

The feature spot in Doorways Magazine #3 will be filled by Bruce Boston and Marge Simon who I will be interviewing simultaneously.

***

The anthology Raw Meat should be available soon. It includes one of my first gay erotic horror stories "Here There Be Tygers."

That's all for now.

Stephen

Friday, February 2nd, 2007
9:08 pm
Doorways Poetry Contest
I am poetry editor for the new paranormal/horror quarterly Doorways. The first part of my job is to pick a featured poet, which includes 3 poems and an interview.

The featured poet for #1 is Michael A. Arnzen.

The second part of my job at Doorways is running a poetry contest. Each contest is themed around 'doorways' and written in a traditional form. The 'form' for contest #1 was the acrostic.

James S. Dorr submitted the winning poem and there were 3 honorable mentions.

Doorways #0 and Doorways #1 are available at:

http://www.doorwaysmagazine.com/news.php

The featured poet for Doorways #2 will be SFPA President and Editor of Amaze: The Cinquain Journal, Deborah P. Kolodji. The form for the new contest is the cinquain. Entries must be a five line cinquain in the usual 2-4-6-8-2 syllable format and must somehow incorporate "doorways" (whatever that means to you, be it supernatural, paranormal, and/or horrific in nature). No entry fee is required.

Here is the Encyclopedia Britannica definition of a cinquain:

Cinquain

A five-line stanza. The American poet Adelaide Crapsey(1878–1914), applied the term in particular to a five-line verse form of specific metre that she developed. Analogous to the Japanese verse forms haiku and tanka, it has two syllables in its first and lastlines and four, six, and eight in the intervening three lines and generally has an iambic cadence.


To Submit:

Paste poem in the body of an email, hit return once and put (END), hit return10 times and put your name, byline (if different), mailing address, and email address.

The reason for this formatting is that the contest will be blindly judged and the editor wants enough blank space between the end of the poem and the author's name to keep it blind. For this reason, please DO NOT include an intro letter or bio(if your poem wins, you will be contacted for a bio).

You can send as many entries as you wish, but please send each entry as a separate email.

Mail entries to: DoorwaysPoetry(at)yahoo(dot)com with "DW Contest Cinquain"in subject line.

The winning entrant for contest #2 will receive:

* Publication in Doorways (plus contributor's copy)
* $10 (equals $2 a line this time around)
* Bondage: Tales of Obsession, Ed. Tyree Campbell
* 8 issue of The Fig Leaf Monthly broadside (Sept. 2006-April 2007)
* Four books from Featured Poet, Deborah P. Kolodji:

Dwarf Stars
Dwarf Stars 2006
Red Planet Dust
Symphony of the Universe


DEADLINE: April 8, 2007
Tuesday, January 23rd, 2007
9:55 pm
2006 In Review - 2007 Forecast
Publications
 
Fiction
"Swallowed!" - Wicked Karnival #7
"Pombo Finds His Waterloo" - Connections
 
Poetry
"Phantasia!" - Bondage: Tales of Obsession
bomb ku - - Scifaikuest 4th Anniversary Issue
"Atom's Apple" (w/Roger E. Naylor) - Scifaikuest 4th Anniversary Issue
"Crane's Eye" - Fig Leaf Monthly
"Icky, Lime Ricky" - Poet's Espresso
"Frost Bitten" - Dark Wisdom #10
"Uroboros" - Doorways Magazine #0
"Conqueror Worm" - Doorways Magazine #0
"The Plainfield Ghoul" - Doorways Magazine #0
 
Other:
 
Translation
"Silver Anniversary" - Fahrenheit
 
SFPA's 1st podcast (Halloween Poetry Reading)
"Crane's Eye"
 
Rhysling Award Nominations
"American Requiem"
"O is for October"
 
Dwarf Stars Award Nomination
haiku "Listen to the wind..."

John B. Baker Award Nomination
"Atom's Apple" (w/Roger E. Naylor)
 
Honorable Mention YBFH #19
"Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate" (f)
 
1 of 10 Finalist in The Harrow's Dark Fiction Contest
"Bodice Ripper" (anthology due in '07)
 
Publications accepted for 2007 (so far)
"Here There Be Tygers" (f) - Raw Meat
"Pele" (p) - Black Petals
"Apocalyptic Sonnet" (p) - Black Petals
"The Exiles" (p) - Black Petals
"What's in a Name?" (p) - Star*Line
"A Lookingglass, Darkly" (p) - Vintage Moon
"Das Marchen" (f) - The Vault of Punk Horror
"Virtual Pair: The Final Peril" (f) - Bleed My Heart Romantic
"Betty Rage" (f) - Punk Horror Podcast
"Love and the Principals of the Quantum Theory" (p) - MSP
3 ku - Sun, Shadow, Mountain
"Cupid" - (p) Fig Leaf Monthly
"Crime of Passion" & "Luck" - Poet's Espresso
"Clay and the Skimmer" - Hungur
I am also slated to be the 'Scifaijin' for Scifaikuest's 5th Anniversary Issue in Aug.

In 2006 I became Poetry Editor for the new paranormal/horror magazine, Doorways. The very first poet I will be publishing is Michael A. Arnzen (winner of 3 Stokers and an IHGA). Besides choosing (and interviewing) a featured poet for each issue of Doorways, I run a poetry contest (the winner of contest #1 is James S. Dorr). Doorways Magazine #1 is due for a Feb. release. I was also interviewed for Wicked Karnival #7 and started compiling/editing an exciting poetry anthology tentatively titled POEtry, which I hope to find a publisher for soon.

All in all not a bad year (when does the $ start pouring in)?


 
9:06 pm
My first publication of 2007!
http://www.blackpetals.net/

On sale January 15th, 2007

                                             ~~FICTION~~

The Blood StainsFrank Roger……………….….……….………..pg.  5

The Monkey SuitKendall Evans…………….……………………..pg. 7

GhosttrainJon Brown……………………..…………..………….pg. 10

Empty ShadowsNeal Wilgus……………..……………..………..pg. 14

Army of LightsC. S. Watts…………...…………………..……….pg. 16

Midnight FeastPaul Edwards…………………………..…….…..pg. 22

LandlockedPhilip Tinkler………..………………….……………pg. 24

The Tree and The SwitchBarry J. House…………..…...……….pg. 28

HomeKatherine Sanger………………..………………..…..…….pg. 32

The OrderM. L. Fortier………………..…………………..……..pg. 34

An Italian LakeK. S. Hardy………..………………..……………pg. 36

HomecomingVic Fortezza……………..……………………….....pg. 38

The Gradual DarknessChris Forbes……...……………….……..pg. 41

The Capellan DreamTommy B. Smith………………..……….....pg. 43

The Lady of the HouseJames Howlett……...……………………pg. 48

Without My RingCharles A. Cave…………..………...…………pg. 51

The Nantucket IncidentBrian C. Petroziello…………..…….…..pg. 53

Mr. MelterChris Reed…………..………………………..……….pg. 57

The Blissful House on Blysworth StreetSkadi meic Beorh…......pg. 60

 

                                           ~~POETRY~~

Chris ForbesTheater of the Night, Waiting For Moonlight….....pg. 9

Gary EveryTamarlane’s Curse, The Revenge of Princess Olga……. ………………………………………………………………..pgs. 12 & 20

Kevin MooreLost………………………………………..……...…pg. 13

Neal WilgusNight, A Good Thing, We’ll Meet Again, Anyway……… ……………………………………………………………....pgs. 21, 37, 40

Cindy RosmusThe Big “M”, Your New Girl……..…..…..pgs. 23 & 42

Alexis ChildBeggar’s Curse, Cobwebs of a Century…….pgs. 52 & 56

Stephen M. WilsonApocalyptic Sonnet, Pele, The Exiles….pgs. 56, 59

G. A. ScheinohaCharacters Unwelcome, Defensive Wounds......pg. 62

 

                                        ~~FEATURES~~

Black Noise-Commentary by Kenneth J. Crist…………………… .pg. 2

MARS-News, Views and Commentary-Chris Friend…………...…pg. 3

EK-CHUAH-Book review by Anne M. Stickel………………….….pg. 47

 

                                ~~Contributing Artists~~

Covers......Pascal Moraux

Inside front cover......Tim Ramstad

Pages 3 & 4......Chris Friend

Pages 5 & 60......Anne M. Stickel

Pages 7 & 53......Ashley “Orca” Gaia

Pages 10, 14, 38, 46, 48, 51......Tim Ramstad

Pages 12, 16, 33, 37, 57......George Silliman

Page 22......Greg Hughes

Pages 24 & 28......John D. Stanton

Pages 34, 36 & 68......Fred Leary

Pages 41 & 43......Laura Givens

Page 38......Nathan Skank

Monday, November 6th, 2006
1:41 pm
Movie Quotes
I stumbled across this on Julia Sevin's page </a></b></a>julia_sevin and thought that it looked fun, so I created my own list. I'm not sure why the original list is 16 movies, but I did a list of 20. With Thanksgiving coming up, I started with my favorite Thanksgiving quote. Have fun.

The Movie Meme

Via </a></b></a>tara_incognito:

A. Pick 16 20 movies that you have actually seen all of and liked.
B. Pick a quote from each movie.
C. Post the quotes in your journal.
D. Have those on your friends list try to guess what the movie is without googling.
E. Strike out the quote once it has been correctly identified and place the guesser’s username directly after the quote.

My quotes:


1) "Dear Lord, thank you for this Thanksgiving holiday. And for all the material possessions we have and enjoy. And for letting us white people kill all the Indians and steal their tribal lands. And stuff ourselves like pigs, even though children in Asia are being napalmed.

2) "First of all, Papa Smurf didn't create Smurfette. Gargamel did. She was sent in as Gargamel's evil spy with the intention of destroying the Smurf village. But the overwhelming goodness of the Smurf way of life transformed her.
</a></b></a>trollpete

3) "She's my sister...She's my daughter...My sister, my daughter!" </strike></a></b></a>ravenelectrick 

4) "May be innocent, may be sweet... ain't half as nice as rotting meat."

5) "I would be remiss in my duty if I did not tell you that the idea of intercourse - the act of your firm, young body... comingling with... withered flesh... sagging breasts... and flabby buttocks... makes me want to vomit."

6) "I was married for four years, and pretended to be happy; and I had six years of analysis, and pretended to be sane. My husband ran off with his boyfriend, and I had an affair with my analyst, who told me I was the worst lay he'd ever had."

7) "I was thrown out of N.Y.U. my freshman year for cheating on my metaphysics final, you know. I looked within the soul of the boy sitting next to me." </a></b></a>
ravenelectrick

8) "A naked American man stole my balloons."</font></a></b></a>trollpete

9) "All my life I had to fight. I had to fight my daddy. I had to fight my uncles. I had to fight my brothers. A girl child ain't safe in a family of men, but I ain't never thought I'd have to fight in my own house!"

10) "That's twice this month you've slipped deadly nightshade into my tea and run off."
</a></b></a>trollpete

11) "You wouldn't be able to do these awful things to me if I weren't still in this chair."

12) "Awful things happen in every apartment house."

13) "Our apartment was so small, that mother made me play in the oven."

14) "You know what I think? I think that we're all in our private traps, clamped in them, and none of us can ever get out. We scratch and we claw, but only at the air, only at each other, and for all of it, we never budge an inch."

15) "I'd like the coffin to be white, and I want it specially lined with satin. White... or pink. Maybe red! Bright flaming red! Let's make it gay!"

16) "God Damn! We just had a near-life experience, fellas!"

17) "Oppenheimer was able to change more than the course of a war. He changed the entire course of human history. Is it wrong to hold on to that kind of hope?"

18) "I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhauser gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain." </a></b></a>ravenelectrick

19) "THE GREAT CONJUNCTION IS THE END OF THE WORLD! Or the beginning. Hm!"

20) "I'm going to The Fourth World... it's sort of like heaven. Only better, because there aren't any Christians!"




Tuesday, October 31st, 2006
1:13 pm
HAPPY HALLOWEEN

I have much news, so this is going to be longer than usual.

 

First, a recording of my poem "Crane's Eye" (see previous post) is available as a free download MP3 File. This is part of SFPA's "Halloween Poetry Reading". To access the entire reading go to: http://www.sfpoetry.com/halloween.html

 

***

 

I had a visit, the other day, from David Agranoff and Cari Beltane. They were moving from San Diego to Canada and stopped in Stockton (my hometown) to meet with me at a local café.

 

I met David and Cari last year at the Stokers in Burbank and we've remained friends. David is co-editor (with Gabriel LLanas) of the forthcoming anthology Vault of Punk Horror, which will include my post-apocalyptic Faust story "Das Märchen". I will be sharing the TOC with such notable authors as John Shirley, Nancy Holder, Jeremy Robert Johnson, and Lisa Morten (to name a few)!

 

While they were here, David asked me to send them a recording of me reading one of my stories for a special podcast that Punk Horror: http://punkhorror.com/ will be airing soon. I've already sent them a text version of the story that I will be recording, "Betty Rage", now I just have to get them a recording.  Thanks David, Gabriel, and Cari.

 

***

 

I have a story that is one of 10 finalists in a contest put on by The Harrow http://www.theharrow.com/. The 10 finalist’s stories have now gone to guest judges Ramsey Campbell and Brian Keene for ranking order (1st prize is $300). Here is the announcement from The Harrow's website:

Harrow Annual 2006 - Contest Finalists

We held a contest in the first half of the year, and the results are official - here are this year's finalists (in alphabetical order):

Stephen Bacon
Lorna Dickson
Christopher Dwyer
Alethea Kontis
Kristopher Lewis
Louis J Messina
Chris Miller
Andersen Prunty
Stephen M. Wilson
Dennis Yates

Finalist stories will be mailed off to Brian Keene and Ramsey Campbell at some point in October to sort out winners and prize money, and all stories will be published some time next year in The Harrow Annual 2006, a print chapbook that will be available for sale on the site. Congratulations to the finalists, and thanks to everyone who participated this year.

 

In a strange coincidence, I met The Harrow's fiction editor, Dru Pagliassotti, at a non-horror related conference that I attended in San Francisco last weekend.

 

***

 

Also, this week, I received news that the Polish scifi/horror webzine Fahrenheit: http://www.fahrenheit.eisp.pl/ will be printing translations of 5 of my stories in upcoming issues starting in November. I'm sure that most of you, like myself, cannot read Polish, but I will post a link when it is available and you can at least see my name on the cover.

 

Here are a few other publications that have accepted my work for future issues: Dark Wisdom, Black Petals, Star*Line, Dwarf Stars, Magazine of Speculative Poetry, Hungur, and Doorways.

 

***

 

Lastly, I wanted to announce that Wicked Karnival # 7 is finally available! I am the 'spotlight author' for #7, which is sadly the final issue of Wicked Karnival. Below, I have posted excerpts from both Tom Moran's interview with me and my story "Swallowed!". I have also included a link to where the issue can be purchased. At some point, I will make a separate and more detailed post about Wicked Karnival and my involvement with them. Enjoy and have a great Halloween.


Interview excerpt:

TOM MORAN
Other than the Bible, what are your earliest influences as far as horror fiction goes?

STEPHEN M. WILSON
Fairytales, especially those collected by the Grimm Brothers and penned by Hans Christian Anderson and Oscar Wilde. I watched The Twilight Zone and The Outer Limits religiously. I read Roald Dahl and (secretly) V. C. Andrews when I was fairly young.


When I was 13, I discovered both Ray Bradbury and Robert Silverberg at the library. They are still two of my favorite writers.

I was lucky to be a teenager in the ‘80’s at the height of horror’s popularity when King, Barker, Straub, McCammon, Koontz, Skipp & Spector, and too many others to list where everywhere. I can’t leave out Omni Magazine.

TOM MORAN
What is the first horror novel that you remember reading?

 

STEPHEN M. WILSON
The Entity by Frank De Filitta when was 11 or 12.

 

TOM MORAN
The scariest?

 

STEPHEN M. WILSON

Moon by James Herbert when I was 16.

 

TOM MORAN
Horror is your second favorite genre, with Science fiction being your true love.  What is it about Sci-fi that you find more compelling?

 

STEPHEN M. WILSON
With horror I prefer supernatural over slice-n-dice and since I’m a skeptic and don’t believe in the supernatural, I consider horror a type of fantasy and read it for escapism.

 

I feel that Sci-fi is often more plausible than horror, at least the social and political themed sci-fi that I prefer (and often times scarier).

 

Actually, most of my favorite authors write fantasy; not the wizards, dragons, swords variety that many misconceive as the only kind of fantasy, but the weird surreal stuff. I consider Bradbury, Borges, and arguably Barker all fantasists.

 

TOM MORAN
In your opinion, whom should people be reading in these genres?

 

STEPHEN M. WILSON
First, anyone who is a writer or fan of genre fiction should never fail to read the classics.

 

Last year in Cemetery Dance #50, writers in the horror field were asked which horror classics they had not read. I was shocked that so many people mentioned the original versions of Frankenstein and Dracula.

 

My first instinct was to send them all copies of those two books. Of course I’m too poor.

 

A few must-reads that come to mind are Hawthorne, Poe, Hoffman, Lovecraft, Irving, Jackson, O’Connor, Heinlein, Dick, and Ellison. Lord Dunsany is one of my favorites.

 

When it comes to more recent, contemporary writers, Chuck Palahniuk, Alan Moore, China Miéville, Michael Cunningham, James Gunn, M. Rickert, Joyce Carol Oats, Jeanette Winterson, and Nina Kiriki Hoffman have all written excellent stuff. I like Joseph Armstead, who I discovered in the pages of Wicked Karnival.

 

As far as poetry is concerned, Yeats, Blake, and Shelley are my favorite classic poets with W. S. Merwin, Neil Gaiman, Michael Arnzen, and Tori Amos being my favorite contemporary poets.

 

Excerpt from Swallowed!:


An image flashes in his mind. Two fetuses entwined head-to-toe within each other’s embrace. A pink sea surrounds them as they suckle on each other’s penises.

I Am the Thing of the Idols. I Am the green, sticky spawn of the stars, the voice returns, We…are one!

The image changes as one of the twins begins to devour the other, the pink sea quickly turning red.

I am ravenous, my brother!

The man is stunned but knows the revelation to be true. He had eaten his own brother! Even in utero, he had been a cannibal.

From this point on, he tries to ignore the fiendish buzzing, the incessant whispering of the hateful and unhuman voice as it continuously assaults him.

He languishes in the fleshy hell-the lonely, dark cell, so lonely that it could destroy the strongest of minds, the voice that has infected his mind like a parasite, the only thing keeping him company. He knows that no one will ever understand what has brought him to this point. The voice is stronger and more pervasive then ever, and like his twin, the man is ravenous.


To sustain himself, he begins to gnaw on the walls of his prison. For the next few weeks-weeks that feel to him more like years-he eats, sleeps, and goes mad.

 

Wicked Karnival # 7 is available for purchase at:

http://www.lulu.com/content/485078

$9.51 Paperback book

$2.38 Download

 

Sunday, October 1st, 2006
1:30 pm
October poetry



My friend Roger E. Naylor is publishing a small themed broadside/zine. The Fig Leaf Monthly debuted in September 2006 and is published in print format. Each month it comprises of one poem penned by Roger and one poem by another local writer here in Central California.

 

Roger asked me to be the guest poet for the month of October and since this issue has a Halloween theme I asked permission to post both poems here to reach a larger audience. Hope you enjoy.

 

 

With best wishes,
Stephen

 

 

Crane’s Eye/ by Stephen M. Wilson

 

In memoriam to Janet Leigh 1927-2004

 

It’s October, Halloween is just around the corner

and I watch the cranes as they return for winter.

As I sit to write, I reminisce of a Halloween past

and another Crane.

I was 13  when I first saw Psycho

& you, Ms. Leigh, with your famous eye, the queen

of that silver screen

 

But before Hollywood lunches with Hitchcock & Welles & Mayer & Frankenheimer

you reigned the Central Valley from Jewel Court

               

Once upon a time you probably strolled the same avenues I now walk

baked under the same Indian summer sun breathed the same smog

 

You may have even learned of Thantos & Eros, like myself, in the halls of 
Haggin Museum gazing with excited dread upon the mummy, Iret-net Hor-irw or 
casting covert glances at Bouguereau’s The Nymphaeum

 

I wonder, Jeanette, did you too watch the cranes?

 

Sixty years ago a photograph

                was your salvation

Then, two years ago, you took

your final migration north

 

As I watch the cranes, I realize that October will always bring you to mind,
and I wonder, will the pen someday be my own salvation?

 

 

Honolulu Halloween/ by REN

 

Yogi Bear and Huckleberry Hound

Honolulu, was it 1964 ? Trick-0r-Treat

My first memory, states-side elephant ride

My second memory, Easter egg hunt siren

My third memory, beach ball holiday terror

My fourth memory, this Bradburyesque day

In California, 1965, Dad, I learned my kindergarten name

Once then, on base, the bugle descent of a flag

 

Yogi, smarter than the average bear, my younger brother

Designated to play Russian Winter to my American Thaw

An elephant does not elevate to a necessarily moral height

Our first Halloween, our first masque, The Terror hinted

Our roles apothecary balance to neutralize a scorpion’s poison

Dad’s birthday was the cusp of Scorpio, but he never let on

That Halloween was his gift to himself, his boys’ joyful pursuit

Wisdoms of Hanna Barbara caricatures of Cold War “realities”

 

Dad and I on the beach somewhere around Oahu that summer

A beach ball tossed into the waves for the fun of it

My reaction of terror the ball would be sucked up by the waves

I would lose the ball to the caprice of the malicious ocean

I took the ball on a mad dash back up the cliff to our hotel

I locked myself in and despite Dad’s demands I refused to return

Later, the day spoiled, Dad angrily took a smoldering cigarette end

In front of Mom, Brother, and I, pierced my inflated punching clown

Life in America’s Outpost Paradise, wallow of hidden harrows

 

 

Fig Leaf Monthly

Oct. 2006

 

.

 

Tuesday, September 19th, 2006
12:43 pm
Writing Links
I decided to post some links to my various writings. I'm still a newbie writer, so the list is not that long, yet. Enjoy.

 
Stuff available for free on the web
 
1 poem:


6 poems:

 
1 poem & 1 flash fiction:

 
Short story:

 
Short story:

 
Interview with Ellen Datlow:

 
Available for purchase

Scifaikuest
Anniversary Issue
(Poem co-written with Roger E. Naylor & Haiku):

Bondage: Tales of Obsession (Poem):
http://projectpulp.com/item_detail.asp?bookID=-531249373

Shadow Box (Flash Fiction):

Fantasy Readers Wanted - Apply Within (Short Story):
 
Sam's Dot Publishing's 2006 Calendar (Flash Fiction):
 
The 2006 Rhysling Award Anthology (2 Poems):

Enchanted Realms: The Vampires of Tinadriel & Other Tales (Short Story):



Wicked Karnival
publications

 WK #7
"Spotlight Author" (includes interview & short story):


WK #4 "Monster Mayhem"
Short Story (1st place winner in "Killer Kritique Fiction Contest") & Poem:
 
WK #5 "Twisted Fairytales"
2 Poems (one of them nominated for The Rhysling Award):

WK #6 "Christmas Carnage"
Print version of Ellen Datlow Interview:
http://www.lulu.com/content/208686
 
WK Special Edition "Halloween Horrors"
Poem (nominated for The Rhysling Award):
 
I didn't know this link existed until today:

IMDB for my role in Omega Cop:
 

Best,

Stephen

Tuesday, June 6th, 2006
5:04 pm
The Mundane Comedy
One, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, nine, ten, eleven, twelve, thirteen, fourteen, fifteen, sixteen, seventeen, eighteen, nineteen, twenty, twenty-one, twenty-two, twenty-three, twenty-four, twenty-five, twenty-six, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-nine, thirty, thirty-one, thirty-two, thirty-three, thirty-four, thirty-five, thirty-six, thirty-seven, thirty-eight, thirty-nine, forty, forty-one, forty-two, forty-three, forty-four, forty-five, forty-six, forty-seven, forty-eight, forty-nine, fifty, fifty-one, fifty-two, fifty-three, fifty-four, fifty-five, fifty-six, fifty-seven, fifty-eight, fifty-nine, sixty, sixty-one, sixty-two, sixty-three, sixty-four, sixty-five, sixty-six, sixty-seven, sixty-eight, sixty-nine, seventy, seventy-one, seventy-two, seventy-three, seventy-four, seventy-five, seventy-six, seventy-seven, seventy-eight, seventy-nine, eighty, eighty-one, eighty-two, eighty-three, eighty-four, eighty-five, eighty-six, eighty-seven, eighty-eight, eighty-nine, ninety, ninety-one, ninety-two, ninety-three, ninety-four, ninety-five, ninety-six, ninety-seven, ninety-eight, ninety-nine, one-hundred, one-hundred-one, one-hundred-two, one-hundred-three, one-hundred-four, one-hundred-five, one-hundred-six, one-hundred-seven, one-hundred-eight, one-hundred-nine, one-hundred-ten, one-hundred-eleven, one-hundred-twelve, one-hundred-thirteen, one-hundred-fourteen, one-hundred-fifteen, one-hundred-sixteen, one-hundred-seventeen, one-hundred-eighteen, one-hundred-nineteen, Lasciate-hundred-twenty, one-hundred-twenty-one, one-hundred-twenty-two, one-hundred-twenty-three, one-hundred-twenty-four, one-hundred-twenty-five, one-hundred-twenty-six, one-hundred-twenty-seven, one-hundred-twenty-eight, one-hundred-twenty-nine, one-hundred-thirty, one-hundred-thirty-one, one-hundred-thirty-two, one-hundred-thirty-three, one-hundred-thirty-four, one-hundred-thirty-five, one-hundred-thirty-six, one-hundred-thirty-seven, one-hundred-thirty-eight, one-hundred-thirty-nine, one-hundred-forty, one-hundred-forty-one, one-hundred-forty-two, one-hundred-forty-three, one-hundred-forty-four, one-hundred-forty-five, one-hundred-forty-six, one-hundred-forty-seven, one-hundred-forty-eight, one-hundred-forty-nine, one-hundred-fifty, one-hundred-fifty-one, one-hundred-fifty-two, one-hundred-fifty-three, one-hundred-fifty-four, one-hundred-fifty-five, one-hundred-fifty-six, one-hundred-fifty-seven, one-hundred-fifty-eight, one-hundred-fifty-nine, one-hundred-sixty, one-hundred-sixty-one, one-hundred-sixty-two, one-hundred-sixty-three, one-hundred-sixty-four, one-hundred-sixty-five, one-hundred-sixty-six, one-hundred-sixty-seven, one-hundred-sixty-eight, one-hundred-sixty-nine, one-hundred-seventy, one-hundred-seventy-one, one-hundred-seventy-two, one-hundred-seventy-three, one-hundred-seventy-four, one-hundred-seventy-five, one-hundred-seventy-six, one-hundred-seventy-seven, one-hundred-seventy-eight, one-hundred-seventy-nine, one-hundred-eighty, one-hundred-eighty-one, one-hundred-eighty-two, one-hundred-eighty-three, one-hundred-eighty-four, one-hundred-eighty-five, one-hundred-eighty-six, one-hundred-eighty-seven, one-hundred-eighty-eight, one-hundred-eighty-nine, one-hundred-ninety, one-hundred-ninety-one, one-hundred-ninety-two, one-hundred-ninety-three, one-hundred-ninety-four, one-hundred-ninety-five, one-hundred-ninety-six, one-hundred-ninety-seven, one-hundred-ninety-eight, one-hundred-ninety-nine, two-hundred, two-hundred-one, two-hundred-two, two-hundred-three, two-hundred-four, two-hundred-five, two-hundred-six, two-hundred-seven, two-hundred-eight, two-hundred-nine, two-hundred-ten, two-hundred-eleven, two-hundred-twelve, two-ogne-thirteen, two-hundred-fourteen, two-hundred-fifteen, two-hundred-sixteen, two-hundred-seventeen, two-hundred-eighteen, two-hundred-nineteen, two-hundred-twenty, two-hundred-twenty-one, two-hundred-twenty-two, two-hundred-twenty-three, two-hundred-twenty-four, two-hundred-twenty-five, two-hundred-twenty-six, two-hundred-twenty-seven, two-hundred-twenty-eight, two-hundred-twenty-nine, two-hundred-thirty, two-hundred-thirty-one, two-hundred-thirty-two, two-hundred-thirty-three, two-hundred-thirty-four, two-hundred-thirty-five, two-hundred-thirty-six, two-hundred-thirty-seven, two-hundred-thirty-eight, two-hundred-thirty-nine, two-hundred-forty, two-hundred-forty-one, two-hundred-forty-two, two-hundred-forty-three, two-hundred-forty-four, two-hundred-forty-five, two-hundred-forty-six, two-hundred-forty-seven, two-hundred-forty-eight, two-hundred-forty-nine, two-hundred-fifty, two-hundred-fifty-one, two-hundred-fifty-two, two-hundred-fifty-three, two-hundred-fifty-four, two-hundred-fifty-five, two-hundred-fifty-six, two-hundred-fifty-seven, two-hundred-fifty-eight, two-hundred-fifty-nine, two-hundred-sixty, two-hundred-sixty-one, two-hundred-sixty-two, two-hundred-sixty-three, two-hundred-sixty-four, two-hundred-sixty-five, two-hundred-sixty-six, two-hundred-sixty-seven, two-hundred-sixty-eight, two-hundred-sixty-nine, two-hundred-seventy, two-hundred-seventy-one, two-hundred-seventy-two, two-hundred-seventy-three, two-hundred-seventy-four, two-hundred-seventy-five, two-hundred-seventy-six, two-hundred-seventy-seven, two-hundred-seventy-eight, two-hundred-seventy-nine, two-hundred-eighty, two-hundred-eighty-one, two-hundred-eighty-two, two-hundred-eighty-three, two-hundred-eighty-four, two-hundred-eighty-five, two-hundred-eighty-six, two-hundred-eighty-seven, two-hundred-eighty-eight, two-hundred-eighty-nine, two-hundred-ninety, two-hundred-ninety-one, two-hundred-ninety-two, two-hundred-ninety-three, two-hundred-ninety-four, two-hundred-ninety-five, two-hundred-ninety-six, two-hundred-ninety-seven, two-hundred-ninety-eight, two-hundred-ninety-nine, three-hundred, three-hundred-one, three-hundred-two, three-hundred-three, three-hundred-four, three-hundred-five, three-hundred-six, three-hundred-seven, three-hundred-eight, three-hundred-nine, three-hundred-ten, three-hundred-eleven, three-hundred-twelve, three-hundred-thirteen, three-hundred-fourteen, three-hundred-fifteen, three-hundred-sixteen, three-hundred-seventeen, three-hundred-eighteen, three-hundred-nineteen, three-hundred-twenty, three-hundred-twenty-one, three-hundred-twenty-two, three-hundred-twenty-three, three-hundred-twenty-four, three-hundred-twenty-five, three-hundred-twenty-six, three-hundred-twenty-seven, three-hundred-twenty-eight, three-hundred-twenty-nine, three-hundred-thirty, three-hundred-thirty-one, three-hundred-thirty-two, three-speranza-thirty-three, three-hundred-thirty-four, three-hundred-thirty-five, three-hundred-thirty-six, three-hundred-thirty-seven, three-hundred-thirty-eight, three-hundred-thirty-nine, three-hundred-forty, three-hundred-forty-one, three-hundred-forty-two, three-hundred-forty-three, three-hundred-forty-four, three-hundred-forty-five, three-hundred-forty-six, three-hundred-forty-seven, three-hundred-forty-eight, three-hundred-forty-nine, three-hundred-fifty, three-hundred-fifty-one, three-hundred-fifty-two, three-hundred-fifty-three, three-hundred-fifty-four, three-hundred-fifty-five, three-hundred-fifty-six, three-hundred-fifty-seven, three-hundred-fifty-eight, three-hundred-fifty-nine, three-hundred-sixty, three-hundred-sixty-one, three-hundred-sixty-two, three-hundred-sixty-three, three-hundred-sixty-four, three-hundred-sixty-five, three-hundred-sixty-six, three-hundred-sixty-seven, three-hundred-sixty-eight, three-hundred-sixty-nine, three-hundred-seventy, three-hundred-seventy-one, three-hundred-seventy-two, three-hundred-seventy-three, three-hundred-seventy-four, three-hundred-seventy-five, three-hundred-seventy-six, three-hundred-seventy-seven, three-hundred-seventy-eight, three-hundred-seventy-nine, three-hundred-eighty, three-hundred-eighty-one, three-hundred-eighty-two, three-hundred-eighty-three, three-hundred-eighty-four, three-hundred-eighty-five, three-hundred-eighty-six, three-hundred-eighty-seven, three-hundred-eighty-eight, three-hundred-eighty-nine, three-hundred-ninety, three-hundred-ninety-one, three-hundred-ninety-two, three-hundred-ninety-three, three-hundred-ninety-four, three-hundred-ninety-five, three-hundred-ninety-six, three-hundred-ninety-seven, three-hundred-ninety-eight, three-hundred-ninety-nine, four-hundred, four-hundred-one, four-hundred-two, four-hundred-three, four-hundred-four, four-hundred-five, four-hundred-six, four-hundred-seven, four-hundred-eight, four-hundred-nine, four-hundred-ten, four-hundred-eleven, four-hundred-twelve, four-hundred-thirteen, four-hundred-fourteen, four-hundred-fifteen, four-hundred-sixteen, four-hundred-seventeen, four-hundred-eighteen, four-hundred-nineteen, four-hundred-twenty, four-hundred-twenty-one, four-hundred-twenty-two, four-hundred-twenty-three, four-hundred-twenty-four, four-hundred-twenty-five, four-hundred-twenty-six, four-hundred-twenty-seven, four-hundred-twenty-eight, four-hundred-twenty-nine, four-hundred-thirty, four-hundred-thirty-one, four-hundred-thirty-two, four-hundred-thirty-three, four-hundred-thirty-four, four-hundred-thirty-five, four-hundred-thirty-six, four-hundred-thirty-seven, four-hundred-thirty-eight, four-hundred-thirty-nine, four-hundred-forty, four-hundred-forty-one, four-hundred-forty-two, four-hundred-forty-three, four-hundred-forty-four, four-hundred-forty-five, four-hundred-forty-six, four-hundred-voi-seven, four-hundred-forty-eight, four-hundred-forty-nine, four-hundred-fifty, four-hundred-fifty-one, four-hundred-fifty-two, four-hundred-fifty-three, four-hundred-fifty-four, four-hundred-fifty-five, four-hundred-fifty-six, four-hundred-fifty-seven, four-hundred-fifty-eight, four-hundred-fifty-nine, four-hundred-sixty, four-hundred-sixty-one, four-hundred-sixty-two, four-hundred-sixty-three, four-hundred-sixty-four, four-hundred-sixty-five, four-hundred-sixty-six, four-hundred-sixty-seven, four-hundred-sixty-eight, four-hundred-sixty-nine, four-hundred-seventy, four-hundred-seventy-one, four-hundred-seventy-two, four-hundred-seventy-three, four-hundred-seventy-four, four-hundred-seventy-five, four-hundred-seventy-six, four-hundred-seventy-seven, four-hundred-seventy-eight, four-hundred-seventy-nine, four-hundred-eighty, four-hundred-eighty-one, four-hundred-eighty-two, four-hundred-eighty-three, four-hundred-eighty-four, four-hundred-eighty-five, four-hundred-eighty-six, four-hundred-eighty-seven, four-hundred-eighty-eight, four-hundred-eighty-nine, four-hundred-ninety, four-hundred-ninety-one, four-hundred-ninety-two, four-hundred-ninety-three, four-hundred-ninety-four, four-hundred-ninety-five, four-hundred-ninety-six, four-hundred-ninety-seven, four-hundred-ninety-eight, four-hundred-ninety-nine, five-hundred, five-hundred-one, five-hundred-two, five-hundred-three, five-hundred-four, five-hundred-five, five-hundred-six, five-hundred-seven, five-hundred-eight, five-hundred-nine, five-hundred-ten, five-hundred-eleven, five-hundred-twelve, five-hundred-thirteen, five-hundred-fourteen, five-hundred-fifteen, five-hundred-sixteen, five-hundred-seventeen, five-hundred-eighteen, five-hundred-nineteen, five-hundred-twenty, five-hundred-twenty-one, five-hundred-twenty-two, five-hundred-twenty-three, five-hundred-twenty-four, five-hundred-twenty-five, five-hundred-twenty-six, five-hundred-twenty-seven, five-hundred-twenty-eight, five-hundred-twenty-nine, five-hundred-thirty, five-hundred-thirty-one, five-hundred-thirty-two, five-hundred-thirty-three, five-hundred-thirty-four, five-hundred-thirty-five, five-hundred-thirty-six, five-hundred-thirty-seven, five-hundred-thirty-eight, five-hundred-thirty-nine, five-hundred-forty, five-hundred-forty-one, five-hundred-forty-two, five-hundred-forty-three, five-hundred-forty-four, five-hundred-forty-five, five-hundred-forty-six, five-hundred-forty-seven, five-hundred-forty-eight, five-hundred-forty-nine, five-hundred-fifty, five-hundred-fifty-one, five-hundred-fifty-two, five-hundred-fifty-three, five-hundred-fifty-four, five-hundred-fifty-five, five-hundred-fifty-six, five-hundred-fifty-seven, five-hundred-fifty-eight, five-hundred-fifty-nine, five-hundred-sixty, five-hundred-sixty-one, five-hundred-sixty-two, five-hundred-sixty-three, five-hundred-sixty-four, five-hundred-sixty-five, five-hundred-sixty-six, five-hundred-sixty-seven, five-hundred-ch’intrate, five-hundred-sixty-nine, five-hundred-seventy, five-hundred-seventy-one, five-hundred-seventy-two, five-hundred-seventy-three, five-hundred-seventy-four, five-hundred-seventy-five, five-hundred-seventy-six, five-hundred-seventy-seven, five-hundred-seventy-eight, five-hundred-seventy-nine, five-hundred-eighty, five-hundred-eighty-one, five-hundred-eighty-two, five-hundred-eighty-three, five-hundred-eighty-four, five-hundred-eighty-five, five-hundred-eighty-six, five-hundred-eighty-seven, five-hundred-eighty-eight, five-hundred-eighty-nine, five-hundred-ninety, five-hundred-ninety-one, five-hundred-ninety-two, five-hundred-ninety-three, five-hundred-ninety-four, five-hundred-ninety-five, five-hundred-ninety-six, five-hundred-ninety-seven, five-hundred-ninety-eight, five-hundred-ninety-nine, six-hundred, six-hundred-one, six-hundred-two, six-hundred-three, six-hundred-four, six-hundred-five, six-hundred-six, six-hundred-seven, six-hundred-eight, six-hundred-nine, six-hundred-ten, six-hundred-eleven, six-hundred-twelve, six-hundred-thirteen, six-hundred-fourteen, six-hundred-fifteen, six-hundred-sixteen, six-hundred-seventeen, six-hundred-eighteen, six-hundred-nineteen, six-hundred-twenty, six-hundred-twenty-one, six-hundred-twenty-two, six-hundred-twenty-three, six-hundred-twenty-four, six-hundred-twenty-five, six-hundred-twenty-six, six-hundred-twenty-seven, six-hundred-twenty-eight, six-hundred-twenty-nine, six-hundred-thirty, six-hundred-thirty-one, six-hundred-thirty-two, six-hundred-thirty-three, six-hundred-thirty-four, six-hundred-thirty-five, six-hundred-thirty-six, six-hundred-thirty-seven, six-hundred-thirty-eight, six-hundred-thirty-nine, six-hundred-forty, six-hundred-forty-one, six-hundred-forty-two, six-hundred-forty-three, six-hundred-forty-four, six-hundred-forty-five, six-hundred-forty-six, six-hundred-forty-seven, six-hundred-forty-eight, six-hundred-forty-nine, six-hundred-fifty, six-hundred-fifty-one, six-hundred-fifty-two, six-hundred-fifty-three, six-hundred-fifty-four, six-hundred-fifty-five, six-hundred-fifty-six, six-hundred-fifty-seven, six-hundred-fifty-eight, six-hundred-fifty-nine, six-hundred-sixty, six-hundred-sixty-one, six-hundred-sixty-two, six-hundred-sixty-three, six-hundred-sixty-four, six-hundred-sixty-five, six-hundred-sixty-six, END.




Current Mood: nerdy
Monday, March 20th, 2006
10:14 pm
"Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate"



Dream Caused by The Flight of a Bumble Bee Around a 
     Pomegranate One Second Before Waking Up by Salvador Da




… It’s a fascinating story … I kept thinking about it when I was trying to read the other stories in the pile.
 
                         Hannah Wolf Bowen, one of 3 judges for the 11th Chi Story Contest
                         http://buymeaclue.livejournal.com/



… an astonishing read ... I think I shall never look at bees--or Sleeping Beauty--in quite the same way again! 

                         Award-winning author Jane Yolen
 
                         www.janeyolen.com/ 



… hard to define, hard to discuss, and hard to completely contemplate. No review could possibly do this story justice. It is slipstream boardering on unadulterated surrealism. Parts of it read like an encyclopedia, others read like an actual story, and others like a science or math lesson. It has aliens, poetry, and relies heavily on the Sleeping Beauty achetype, as well as pomegranates and honey as repeating motifs. Firmly reminiscent of the Kelly Link school of writing, yet Wilson manages to do something in that tradition all on his own.

It also had some feminist elements thrown into the mix, which are depicted with originality via the imagery: “As the drone ejaculates into the queen, his genitals are ripped from him, rupturing his abdomen. His male organ left dangling from the queen’s vulva, the male plummets to the earth and dies.” Too bad many of the themes get slightly buried under the style, however it gets major brownie points for that particular style. I hope this one gets nominated for the Tiptree award. 

                         Eric Joel Bresin
– TANGENT short fiction review 
                         http://www.geocities.com/drkshadow03/



… a story that should be read in a time and place where you won't be interrupted. It consists of a blend of fact and folklore, poetry and story. It consists of segments labeled with nonfictional headers that sometimes repeat themselves while continuing to expand the story's bizarre landscape. It is a story of a bewitched child, blessed, but taken away in her youth. Taken away and taken away again. It is a story about bees and honey, myth and homemade remedies, tigers and castles. It has princes and angels and aliens. It's not a typical narrative and it is not light reading. A surrealistic fairy tale without a happily ever after, unless the happy is for the survival and growth of something we, as humans, are not. 

                         Pam McNew
– SHORTFORM 
                         http://community.livejournal.com/shortform/35952.html 



… a highly unique story … This one grows on you the more you read – a flight of fantasy that is at once entertaining and strangely educational. It’s hard to coherently describe this story without giving certain elements away: suffice it to say bees are a big component and the prose is unlike anything you’ll have come across before. 

                         Matthew Tait
– HORRORSCOPE 
                         http://ozhorrorscope.blogspot.com/2005/12/review-chizine-treatment-of-light-and.html 



This story is subtle and brilliant, told almost entirely through implication. We must piece together the sense of what’s going on through the tantalizing pieces that Wilson gives us: recipes for honey-mead and royal jelly; biology lessons about bee anatomy, hive behavior, reproduction, and the creation of the hive’s queen; the repetition of the Briar Rose story (the pricking of the finger is a bee-sting); and a science fiction tale of aliens looking for reproductive hosts. Horror in the vein of Machen or Lovecraft; horror implied rather than overt. Excellent. 

                         Tom Mula
- Grad paper for Columbia College Chicago 
                         http://chizine.com/chizine_paper_Tom_Mula.pdf 



“Dream” was my favorite read of last year. It's the kind of really elaborate, well organized, simultaneously poetic and smarty-pantsie kind of thing that I both adore and learn from. Also worth noting is that it's the ONLY short story I recommended for a Stoker. 

                         Julia Sevin, author and Co-editor of
Corpse Blossoms 
                         http://www.creepinghemlock.com/


Read "Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate": http://chizine.com/dream_caused.htm





Wednesday, March 15th, 2006
10:46 pm
1st Bad Review

During my Google search of the previous post, I came across the first bad review of something that I've written. The review was written by Jason Fischer for Tangent (www.tangentonline.com/) and was for the charity e-anthology Shadow Box edited by Shane Jiraiya Cummings and Angela Challis. He reviews each of the 70 or so flash stories in the anthology.

Here is what he had to say about my contribution:

“Keep Tahoe Blue” by Stephen M Wilson
While this story begins on a high note of sinister gore, it rapidly descends into a pale pastiche of the Cthulhu experience. The protagonists' dialogue is clichéd and awful. This gun-toting occultist seems to have been wrenched from a role-playing game and dropped kicking and screaming into a short story.


I was amused when I read this because 99% of it is completely true--he got what I was doing, he just didn't seem to get that I was doing it for a purpose. "Keep Tahoe Blue" is a parody, not a 'pastiche' (there is a difference, Mr. Fischer).

Anyhow, the review didn't bother me, on the contrary it made me smile--it's exciting to me to even be published in venues that are getting reviewed (whether positive or not).

So that's that.

I will be posting a list of the reviews on my ChiZine story "Dream Caused by the Flight of a Bee Around a Pomegranate" soon.

Current Mood: amused
10:38 pm
Googled
I Googled (not sure if that is a word) myself today and was surprised that the top 5 entries (along with #9) out of 450 were all actually me.

Here are the results:

The Work of Stephen M. WilsonStephen M Wilson Stephen has had coffee with Allen Ginsberg, interviewed Ellen Datlow, and been a finalist in L. Ron Hubbard’s Writers of the Future contest ...
www.sff.net/people/stephenmwilson/ - 11k - Cached - Similar pages


Mary Jane Minuscule by Stephen M. Wilson - www.ezboard.com(9/10/05 6:54 pm) Reply, Mary Jane Minuscule by Stephen M. Wilson. Mary Jane Minuscule by Stephen M. Wilson Once upon a time, there was this blue sky blonde ...
p216.ezboard.com/fvoodoopoetsfrm34. showMessage?topicID=72.topic - 37k - Cached - Similar pages


Stephen M. WilsonPayment info Bookstore/Book club info Contact us, Stephen M. Wilson. Stephen M. Wilson is a father of three (four if you count his cat, Aires). ...www.silverlakepublishing.com/ contribs/authors/wilson.html - 8k - Cached - Similar pages


Stephen M. Wilson | Dream Caused By the Flight of a Bee Around a ...Copyright © Stephen M. Wilson, 2005. All Rights Reserved. ... Stephen M. Wilson is a proud member of the HWA. He has three teenagers, is 'involved' with ...
chizine.com/dream_caused.htm - 31k - Cached - Similar pages


Stephen M. Wilson | Dream Caused By the Flight of a Bee Around a ...Copyright © Stephen M. Wilson, 2005. All Rights Reserved. Used by permission of the author. editorial / fiction & poetry / column / submissions / contact ...
chizine.com/dream_caused_p.htm - 28k - Cached - Similar pages


Stephen M. Wilson - The MIT PressThe MIT Press online catalog contains descriptions of in-print and out-of-print books, current and past journals, online ordering/subscription options, ...
mitpress.mit.edu/catalog/author/default.asp?aid=22117 - 10k - Cached - Similar pages


Dr. Stephen M. Wilson, MD - Check Doctor QualityDr. Stephen M. Wilson - Check Doctor Quality. ... Get A Detailed Report on Dr. Stephen M. Wilson. Looking for a different doctor? Click here to search >> ...
www.healthgrades.com/directory_search/physician/ profiles/dr-md-reports/Dr-Stephen-Wilson-MD-1CA8E0BB.cfm - 20k - Cached - Similar pages


Research General Surgeons by name – Doctor ReportsResearch General Surgeons by name. ... You are here: Home > General Surgeons > Williamst-Winsl · HealthGrades, Guiding America to Better Healthcare ™ ...
www.healthgrades.com/directory_search/ Physician/Profiles/General-Surgery/alphas231.cfm - 58k - Cached - Similar pages
[ More results from www.healthgrades.com ]


Stephen M. WilsonStephen M. Wilson. elf_fyr@yahoo.com Stephen live in Stockton, California. He has had fiction, nonfiction and poetry published in ZamBomba!, Outword, ... www.haikuhut.com/Short%20Stuff%20IV/ Stephen%20M.%20Wilson.htm - 4k - Cached - Similar pages


Law Offices of Stephen M. Wilson, PC - a Huntsville, Alabama (AL ...Search this free lawyer directory to find lawyers or attorneys in your city or state. Find a law firm by practice area to help you with your legal needs.
lawyers.findlaw.com/lawyer/lawyer_dir/ search/jsp/profile_viewFirm.jsp?officeUid=6213217 - 19k - Cached - Similar pages

Current Mood: contemplative
Monday, March 13th, 2006
10:17 pm
Bondage: Tales of Obsession
I recently received my contributor's copy of Bondage: Tales of Obsession (Sam's Dot Publishing). 

Cover ArtMy poem "Phantasia!" is included.

Here is the publisher's blurb on Bondage (followed by the TOC):


With seven original tales and eleven all-new poems, including at least one that is sure to be banned in Orlando, Anaheim, and Paris, and illustrated by Marge B. Simon and Marcia A. Borell, BONDAGE: Tales Of Obsession will take you to worlds of the unanticipated, the compulsive, and the perverse, both in this Universe and in your mind. Housed inside a cover designed in the classic sense by Bruce Boston, this trade paperback is sure to be talked about for decades to come.
US and Canadian orders:$13.50 + $2.00 S&H OUR PRICE: $12.85 + $2.00 S&H
http://www.genremall.com/samsdotpublishing.htm


TOC

Fiction:


The Acculturate - Trent Roman
Ties That Bind - JE Gurley
Broken Man - Michael Greenhut
Isolation - Michelle Scott
The Bride - Gary Madden
Red Rain - Mark Anthony Brennan
Sentimental - Tyree Campbell (editor)


Poetry:


The Kenning Glass - Jennifer Crow
Neighbors - Marge B. Simon
drunk with life - Terrie Relf & s.c. virtes
Forever Lost - Cathy Buburuz
Beautiful Machines - Bruce Boston
Discipline - Ilona Hegedus
Take the Cold Horror - Bruce Boston
Melissa - James S. Dorr
Phantasia! - Stephen M. Wilson
GPS Pepys and the Postnuclear Pigeons - Greg Beatty
Tattoo - Cythera
What Knots May Come - Jennifer Crow



Saturday, March 11th, 2006
5:01 pm
...And To All A Good Night
An interview with Ellen Datlow
conducted by Stephen M. Wilson

Ellen Datlow has been editor of SCI FICTION at the SCIFI Channel’s website, SCIFI.COM, for six years, a position that will continue through the end of 2005 (for more information, read Ellen’s statement at: (http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/message.html).

She was fiction editor of OMNI for over seventeen years and created the award-winning website Event Horizon with her former OMNI colleagues. 

With Terri Windling, she has co-edited six-volumes of adult fairy tales that began with Snow White, Blood Red and two children's fairy tale anthologies: A Wolf at the Door and Swan Sister. They have also collaborated on two young adult anthologies: The Green Man and The Faery Reel, an erotic fantasy anthology Sirens and other Daemon Lovers, and the first sixteen volumes of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror. She is still editing the horror half of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror (now with Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant).

Solo, she has edited anthologies on vampirism:
Blood is not Enough and A Whisper of Blood, sf and gender: Alien Sex and Off Limits, sexual horror: Little Deaths, and revenge: Lethal Kisses. She has edited two animal themed anthologies: Twists of the Tale (cat horror) and Vanishing Acts (endangered species). Her most recent anthology is The Dark: New Ghost Stories. 

Datlow has won several awards for her work as an editor including seven World Fantasy Awards, two Bram Stoker Awards, an International Horror Guild Award, Three Hugo Awards (including Best Website in 2005 for SCIFICTION), and the Locus Award (also in 2005). 

She is also a Consulting Editor for Tor Books. She lives in New York City.


SW: For 10 years now you have been at the forefront of e-publishing (Omni Magazine left print for cyberspace in 1996) with your editorial work on three of the most successful online magazines, OMNI Online, Event Horizon, and, most recently, SCIFICTION. What do you think is the biggest pro of e-publishing? The biggest con? 

ED: Length is no longer a problem. In print, it was rare that I could run novellas. Now I can. I can run stories with “footnotes” that appear as pop-ups, which is fun. I was able to run Michael Swanwick’s Periodic Table of Science Fiction as one big periodic table with each element popping up into an individual short-short. Stories can stay up indefinitely and don’t go “out of print.” (unless the author asks for the story to be removed from the site).
The only con I can think of is that people might have trouble reading in the bathtub (although they could take their laptop or print out the stories into the tub with them, I guess). 

SW: While we’re on the subject of the internet, anyone who has visited your website (http://www.datlow.com/index.html) should be familiar with Lily and Dinah (Ellen’s cats). You are also an avid collector of dolls. Do your dolls have names? Do you have a personal favorite? 

ED: Unfortunately, Lily died of kidney failure in July. But now I’ve gotten a tabby kitten named Bella.
None of the dolls have names other than Billikins, who came with that name. I have a soft spot for the three faced dolls. They’re just so weird. 

SW: Under the links heading on your website you have a link called: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly: The Weird, Weird, & Weirdest of the Web. What, to date, is the weirdest website that you have thus far come across? 

ED: Meatmation, which are puppets made from raw hamburger, although I have to admit I haven’t added any in awhile. I used to surf the web looking for weird websites while working for OMNI online as part of the job, but I don’t have time any more. Got too caught up in blogs, newsgroups, and bulletin boards instead. 

SW: Continuing on the subject of weird, you and I are both appreciators of Bosch. What is your favorite Bosch painting? What other artists do you like? 

ED: The Garden of Earthly Delights. 

The black Goyas, Albrecht Dürer, Max Ernst, Max Beckmann, Peter Bruegel, Vincent Van Gogh, some of Picasso, Francis Bacon, Paul Cadmus, Hans Bellmer –those are a few. 

SW: There seems to be a lot of disagreement within the horror community itself as to what qualifies as horror. How do you define horror? Is it a genre? An emotion? 

ED: I define horror as a literature of fear, whether it be supernatural or psychological. I believe it’s an emotion, and that because of this it can be found in combination with mainstream, mystery, and science fiction. “Who Goes There?” by John Campbell is sf/horror for example. 

SW: While you’re at it, can you also give us the final word on ‘speculative fiction’? What exactly is it and how does it fit into the mix with horror, sci-fi, and fantasy? 

ED: Speculative fiction is just a broader term for science fiction. It might encompass futuristic stories without obvious science in them such as political speculation, but basically it’s used pretty interchangeably with “science fiction.” 

SW: You have mentioned in several previous interviews that you are not a writer. I disagree with that self-assessment; your introductions to the annual YBF&H anthologies intelligently and comprehensively cover every aspect of the horror field from fiction to film to comic books. What is your process for composing these essays—do you work on them throughout the year or is it more of a cram-session near deadline? 

ED: Thank you, but to me those are just compilations of information, with some judgments/remarks thrown in.
I work on the essay throughout the year, adding to it as I read. But there is always that last minute cramming when I skim all the nonfiction and art books and other odds and ends I haven’t gotten to during the year. 

SW: As you know, I have been trying to sell an anthology for nearly two years. The most common response that I have received from publishers is “Anthologies don’t sell.” Even with your credentials and reputation, do you still occasionally get this response? Can we expect to see a non-themed horror anthology from you sometime in the near future? 

ED: Sure. It’s a battle to sell almost every anthology, although YA seems to be selling easier—for now. It took at least three years for me to sell The Dark to Tor. I’ve been hoping to edit a non-theme horror anthology for years, although I’ve always enjoyed editing my themed ones. I am currently working on a non-theme horror anthology called Inferno. However, it’s not open, as I don’t have time to read as many mss as would come in if it was. 

SW: Recommend three stories that you feel all horror fans (and writers) should read at least once before they die. 

ED: I can’t. But I can recommend a few writers whose short stories MUST be read: 

Harlan Ellison, Richard Matheson, Charles Beaumont, Robert Bloch, Flannery O’Connor, and Fritz Leiber. 

SW: Name a few up-and-coming writers that we should keep a look-out for. 

ED: Simon Bestwick, Melanie Fazi, Margo Lanagan, Simon Brown, Laird Barron, Emerson Scott Bull, Philip Raines & Harvey Welles, Don Tumasonis, M. Rickert, Joe Hill, Barbara Roden (co-publisher of Ash-Tree Press has unexpectedly proven herself an excellent writer), China Miéville is writing the occasional excellent horror story, Marc Laidlaw is back writing short horror fiction—these are newer writers whose work I’ve chosen for YBF&H the past few years. 

SW: What books should people put under their Christmas trees this year? 

ED: Novels: 

Glass Soup
by Jonathan Carroll (Tor) (I’m his editor, so I’m biased), 

Bangkok Tattoo
by John Burdett (follow up to the wonderful Bangkok 8 from last year). 

Anthologies: 

Don’t Turn Out the Light
edited by Stephen Jones (PS Publishing), 

Acquainted With the Night
edited by Christopher Roden (Ash-Tree Press), 

Collections: 

Looking for Jake by China Miéville--collection (Del Rey), 

Black Juice
by Margo Lanagan, (HarperCollins)—marketed as YA but really for adults, 

Magic for Beginners
by Kelly Link (Small Beer), 

As the Crow Flies
by Dave Hutchinson (BeWrite) –excellent, underrated British writer of sf/f/h, 

TwentiethCentury Ghosts
by Joe Hill (PS Publishing) 

Art/nonfiction: 

Mrs. Ballard’s Parrots by Arne Swenson (Abrams) is a strange book of photographs of this woman’s parrots dressed up in clothes and posing in artful tableaux. 

SW: Can you recommend a good restaurant in Manhattan? 

ED: Depends on the kind of food. My local Japanese restaurant, Sakura on Hudson street. 

For a good brunch with a terrific prickly pear frozen margarita and the best guacamole in town: Dos Caminos (there are two, one in the 20s and one on Houston street). 

Chinese: Grand Szechwan on St Mark’s Place or my local Sung Chu Mei. 

SW: I'm honored that you took the time to chat. Thank you. I wish you as good of a year in '06 as you've had in '05. 

ED: You’re very welcome. Me too. 


Stephen has had coffee with Allen Ginsberg, been an L. Ron Hubbard’s Writers of the Future finalist, and been nominated for the Rhysling Award. He belongs to both the HWA and the SFPA. Stephen has three children and is 'involved' with novelist J. J. Ace. He resides in an old Victorian house in California with a cat, two dogs, several ghosts, and a witch. His website is: www.StephenMWilson.com.


Interview conducted via email and first published in The Wicked Karnival #6 - Dec. 2005
2:23 pm
Getting started
In the next week or two, I will be making several posts here. These will be a form of catch-up since this is a new thing for me. After that I will probably only post once or twice a month. My first post was the interview that I conducted with Ellen Datlow in Dec. '05 for The Wicked Karnival #6 http://www.wickedkarnival.com/. I posted it as a locked topic so that she could link it to her site. I am going to re-post that interview so that if anyone would like to make comments, they can.

Best,
Stephen

Current Mood: thoughtful
Saturday, February 25th, 2006
11:03 pm
…And To All A Good Night
An interview with Ellen Datlow
conducted by Stephen M. Wilson

Ellen Datlow has been editor of SCI FICTION at the SCIFI Channel’s website, SCIFI.COM, for six years, a position that will continue through the end of 2005 (for more information, read Ellen’s statement at: (http://www.scifi.com/scifiction/message.html).

She was fiction editor of OMNI for over seventeen years and created the award-winning website Event Horizon with her former OMNI colleagues. 

With Terri Windling, she has co-edited six-volumes of adult fairy tales that began with Snow White, Blood Red and two children's fairy tale anthologies: A Wolf at the Door and Swan Sister. They have also collaborated on two young adult anthologies: The Green Man and The Faery Reel, an erotic fantasy anthology Sirens and other Daemon Lovers, and the first sixteen volumes of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror. She is still editing the horror half of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror (now with Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant).

Solo, she has edited anthologies on vampirism:
Blood is not Enough and A Whisper of Blood, sf and gender: Alien Sex and Off Limits, sexual horror: Little Deaths, and revenge: Lethal Kisses. She has edited two animal themed anthologies: Twists of the Tale (cat horror) and Vanishing Acts (endangered species). Her most recent anthology is The Dark: New Ghost Stories. 

Datlow has won several awards for her work as an editor including seven World Fantasy Awards, two Bram Stoker Awards, an International Horror Guild Award, Three Hugo Awards (including Best Website in 2005 for SCIFICTION), and the Locus Award (also in 2005). 

She is also a Consulting Editor for Tor Books. She lives in New York City.


SW: For 10 years now you have been at the forefront of e-publishing (Omni Magazine left print for cyberspace in 1996) with your editorial work on three of the most successful online magazines, OMNI Online, Event Horizon, and, most recently, SCIFICTION. What do you think is the biggest pro of e-publishing? The biggest con? 

ED: Length is no longer a problem. In print, it was rare that I could run novellas. Now I can. I can run stories with “footnotes” that appear as pop-ups, which is fun. I was able to run Michael Swanwick’s Periodic Table of Science Fiction as one big periodic table with each element popping up into an individual short-short. Stories can stay up indefinitely and don’t go “out of print.” (unless the author asks for the story to be removed from the site).
The only con I can think of is that people might have trouble reading in the bathtub (although they could take their laptop or print out the stories into the tub with them, I guess). 

SW: While we’re on the subject of the internet, anyone who has visited your website (http://www.datlow.com/index.html) should be familiar with Lily and Dinah (Ellen’s cats). You are also an avid collector of dolls. Do your dolls have names? Do you have a personal favorite? 

ED: Unfortunately, Lily died of kidney failure in July. But now I’ve gotten a tabby kitten named Bella.
None of the dolls have names other than Billikins, who came with that name. I have a soft spot for the three faced dolls. They’re just so weird. 

SW: Under the links heading on your website you have a link called: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly: The Weird, Weird, & Weirdest of the Web. What, to date, is the weirdest website that you have thus far come across? 

ED: Meatmation, which are puppets made from raw hamburger, although I have to admit I haven’t added any in awhile. I used to surf the web looking for weird websites while working for OMNI online as part of the job, but I don’t have time any more. Got too caught up in blogs, newsgroups, and bulletin boards instead. 

SW: Continuing on the subject of weird, you and I are both appreciators of Bosch. What is your favorite Bosch painting? What other artists do you like? 

ED: The Garden of Earthly Delights. 

The black Goyas, Albrecht Dürer, Max Ernst, Max Beckmann, Peter Bruegel, Vincent Van Gogh, some of Picasso, Francis Bacon, Paul Cadmus, Hans Bellmer –those are a few. 

SW: There seems to be a lot of disagreement within the horror community itself as to what qualifies as horror. How do you define horror? Is it a genre? An emotion? 

ED: I define horror as a literature of fear, whether it be supernatural or psychological. I believe it’s an emotion, and that because of this it can be found in combination with mainstream, mystery, and science fiction. “Who Goes There?” by John Campbell is sf/horror for example. 

SW: While you’re at it, can you also give us the final word on ‘speculative fiction’? What exactly is it and how does it fit into the mix with horror, sci-fi, and fantasy? 

ED: Speculative fiction is just a broader term for science fiction. It might encompass futuristic stories without obvious science in them such as political speculation, but basically it’s used pretty interchangeably with “science fiction.” 

SW: You have mentioned in several previous interviews that you are not a writer. I disagree with that self-assessment; your introductions to the annual YBF&H anthologies intelligently and comprehensively cover every aspect of the horror field from fiction to film to comic books. What is your process for composing these essays—do you work on them throughout the year or is it more of a cram-session near deadline? 

ED: Thank you, but to me those are just compilations of information, with some judgments/remarks thrown in.
I work on the essay throughout the year, adding to it as I read. But there is always that last minute cramming when I skim all the nonfiction and art books and other odds and ends I haven’t gotten to during the year. 

SW: As you know, I have been trying to sell an anthology for nearly two years. The most common response that I have received from publishers is “Anthologies don’t sell.” Even with your credentials and reputation, do you still occasionally get this response? Can we expect to see a non-themed horror anthology from you sometime in the near future? 

ED: Sure. It’s a battle to sell almost every anthology, although YA seems to be selling easier—for now. It took at least three years for me to sell The Dark to Tor. I’ve been hoping to edit a non-theme horror anthology for years, although I’ve always enjoyed editing my themed ones. I am currently working on a non-theme horror anthology called Inferno. However, it’s not open, as I don’t have time to read as many mss as would come in if it was. 

SW: Recommend three stories that you feel all horror fans (and writers) should read at least once before they die. 

ED: I can’t. But I can recommend a few writers whose short stories MUST be read: 

Harlan Ellison, Richard Matheson, Charles Beaumont, Robert Bloch, Flannery O’Connor, and Fritz Leiber. 

SW: Name a few up-and-coming writers that we should keep a look-out for. 

ED: Simon Bestwick, Melanie Fazi, Margo Lanagan, Simon Brown, Laird Barron, Emerson Scott Bull, Philip Raines & Harvey Welles, Don Tumasonis, M. Rickert, Joe Hill, Barbara Roden (co-publisher of Ash-Tree Press has unexpectedly proven herself an excellent writer), China Miéville is writing the occasional excellent horror story, Marc Laidlaw is back writing short horror fiction—these are newer writers whose work I’ve chosen for YBF&H the past few years. 

SW: What books should people put under their Christmas trees this year? 

ED: Novels: 

Glass Soup
by Jonathan Carroll (Tor) (I’m his editor, so I’m biased), 

Bangkok Tattoo
by John Burdett (follow up to the wonderful Bangkok 8 from last year). 

Anthologies: 

Don’t Turn Out the Light
edited by Stephen Jones (PS Publishing), 

Acquainted With the Night
edited by Christopher Roden (Ash-Tree Press), 

Collections: 

Looking for Jake by China Miéville--collection (Del Rey), 

Black Juice
by Margo Lanagan, (HarperCollins)—marketed as YA but really for adults, 

Magic for Beginners
by Kelly Link (Small Beer), 

As the Crow Flies
by Dave Hutchinson (BeWrite) –excellent, underrated British writer of sf/f/h, 

TwentiethCentury Ghosts
by Joe Hill (PS Publishing) 

Art/nonfiction: 

Mrs. Ballard’s Parrots by Arne Swenson (Abrams) is a strange book of photographs of this woman’s parrots dressed up in clothes and posing in artful tableaux. 

SW: Can you recommend a good restaurant in Manhattan? 

ED: Depends on the kind of food. My local Japanese restaurant, Sakura on Hudson street. 

For a good brunch with a terrific prickly pear frozen margarita and the best guacamole in town: Dos Caminos (there are two, one in the 20s and one on Houston street). 

Chinese: Grand Szechwan on St Mark’s Place or my local Sung Chu Mei. 

SW: I'm honored that you took the time to chat. Thank you. I wish you as good of a year in '06 as you've had in '05. 

ED: You’re very welcome. Me too. 


Stephen has had coffee with Allen Ginsberg, been an L. Ron Hubbard’s Writers of the Future finalist, and been nominated for the Rhysling Award. He belongs to both the HWA and the SFPA. Stephen has three children and is 'involved' with novelist J. J. Ace. He resides in an old Victorian house in California with a cat, two dogs, several ghosts, and a witch. His website is: www.StephenMWilson.com.


Interview conducted via email and first published in The Wicked Karnival #6 - Dec. 2005
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